Category Archives: Road Trip

Dubuque County Aux. – Vol. 2

Continuing on with the auxiliary images I took while harvesting the town signs in Dubuque County. All of these pictures were taken in Dubuque which is by far my favorite river town in Iowa. Maybe I should say river city. Fun fact: Mason City is actually the River City from the musical The Music Man, but I bet you have no clue what river flows through it. I might like towns like Marquette and Lansing better. But I do love Dubuque!


Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque County  - Dubuque

Dubuque has so many amazing murals! Up there with Creston!

The last few pictures of the Fenelon Place Elevator. Sorta Dubuque’s answer to Burlington’s Snake Alley. Both answers to the same issue.

I Scream: Glidden Field Work

After I knocked down the mind-blowing tenderloin from Darrell’s Place, we started to head back to Boone. However, we needed to get some ice cream! We stopped at The Dairy Mart in Glidden.

Here are some pictures:


I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I Scream: The Dairy Mart

I got a raspberry malt. Was it good? Well you know I live by the Ted Lasso philosophy on ice cream:

Ice cream is the best. It’s kinda like seeing Billy Joel perform live. Never disappoints.”

Now I wouldn’t go out of my way to get Dairy Mart, but if I’m driving by, I would stop.

Next Sunday’s food adventure will involve donuts.

Oskaloosa Christmas Lighted Parade – II

Time to share the rest of the images from when Carla, Teresa, and I went Oskaloosa to check out the largest and oldest Christmas Lighted Parade in Iowa. I’m afraid the pictures don’t really do it justice. If you ever have a chance to check it out, I would highly recommend it. Just dress warm!


Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Oskaloosa Lighted Parade - 2022

Finding parking is particularly hard for this event as there isn’t a ton of parking in downtown Oskaloosa and the streets are packed for the parade. We got to the parade what I thought was plenty early, but still there was no parking to be found. Then as we were driving down a street that was a mere block away from the parade route, there was an elderly gentleman standing on our porch waving us to park in his driveway.

We parked in his driveway cause he couldn’t go to the parade but he wanted people to be able to park close to it and his driveway was open. It was very generous and we offered him money. But he wasn’t like the people that give up their yard for cars during the Iowa State Fair. He was just being generous. Teresa made him a card and mailed it to him.

The next trip I will cover is a trip I made to Clear Lake to see the Color the Sky Festival.

Des Moines & Louisa County Aux. – Vol. 5

This is the final collection of images I took while harvesting the town signs of Des Moines & Louisa County. I really found Burlington to be photogenic and would like to go back there and spend some time photographing it. Also, and not unrelated, there is a stop on the Tenderloin Trail 2.0 that could be incorporated into any trip of the sort.

Last time we left off on Snake Alley in Burlington:


Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington
The less famous but still fascinating Cobblestone Alley.

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County - Burlington

Des Moines County  -
Illinois

Des Moines County  - Middletown
Middletown – The site of a giant ammunition plant that I had no clue existed.

Des Moines County  -
A resident of Danville was a pen pal of Anne Frank.

Des Moines County

Des Moines County

Des Moines County

Des Moines County

Des Moines County

Louisa County - Cairo
Cairo

Louisa County - Cairo

Louisa County - Cairo

Louisa County

Louisa County - Wyman
Wyman

Washington County - Ainsworth
A meal from the Dairy Mart in Ainsworth.

Marshall County - Quarry

Marshall County - Quarry

Marshall County - Quarry
I want one.

Marshall County - Quarry
Quarry

Marshall County - Quarry

Marshall County - Quarry

I think we need to dive into the history of a couple things. Starting with Snake Alley.

From the Wiki:

The physical limitations and steep elevation of Heritage Hill inspired the construction of Snake Alley in 1894. It was intended to link the downtown business district and the neighborhood shopping area located on North Sixth Street, of which Snake Alley is a one-block section. Three German immigrants conceived and carried out the idea of a winding hillside street, similar to vineyard paths in France and Germany: Charles Starker, an architect and landscape engineer; William Steyh, the city engineer; and George Kriechbaum, a paving contractor. The street was completed in 1898, but was not originally named Snake Alley, as it was considered part of North Sixth Street; some years later, a resident noted that it reminded him of a snake winding its way down the hill, and the name stuck.

The alley originally provided a shortcut from Heritage Hill to the business district. Bricks were laid at an angle to allow horses better footing as they descended. Unfortunately, riding horses back up the alley often resulted in a loss of control at the top; for this reason, even to this day, Snake Alley remains a one-way street, with all traffic heading downhill.

And about that connection with Anne Frank. From the Danville Library website:

Our story goes back to the fall of 1939 when a Danville teacher, Miss Birdie Mathews, initiated a pen pal exchange for her class. Ten year old Juanita Wagner picked a name from a list of pen pals. She chose a girl her own age who lived in Amsterdam. The girl’s name was Anne Frank.
Danville, Iowa is one of two places in the world to view the pen pal letters. These letters are on display at the Danville Museum.

The things you had no clue were in Iowa!!

The next set of auxiliary images will come from a rain day I spent in Dubuque County.

Tenderloin Trail 2.0: Hamlin, Iowa

A few weeks back I went on a road trip with Nader that included the State Center Rose Festival, dropping off my entries to the Iowa State Fair Photography Salon AND lunch at Darrell’s Place in Hamlin.

I’ve actually written a post about Darrell’s Place over a decade ago when I visited the place with Baier. It was the first restaurant to win Best Tenderloin in Iowa and no joke it is definitely one of the best tenderloins I’ve ever had.

Here are some pictures:


Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
So cheap!

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
Pepsi!

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
This guy and his potato salad!

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
Seriously. I don’t know anybody that loves potato salad like Nader loves potato salad.

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
Nader’s chicken strips.

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
The goodness.

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place
1st bite.

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

Tenderloin Trail 2.0 - Darrell's Place

If you are ever near Hamlin, Iowa and I mean remotely near, you should make a detour and eat there. The food is absolutely amazing! I kind of want to stop there again when I go to Omaha in a couple of weeks, but I also have my eye on a couple of other restaurants for that trip.

The next food adventure will involve ice cream!

The Joke

You’re feeling nervous, aren’t you, boy?
With your quiet voice and impeccable style
Don’t ever let them steal your joy
And your gentle ways
To keep ’em from running wild

They can kick dirt in your face
Dress you down, and tell you that your place
Is in the middle, when they hate the way you shine

I see you tugging on your shirt
Trying to hide inside of it
And hide how much it hurts

Let ’em laugh while they can
Let ’em spin, let ’em scatter in the wind
I have been to the movies, I’ve seen how it ends
And the joke’s on them
-Brandi Carlile

Thursdays are for flowers! This flowertography collection consists of tulip pictures I took on a trip I took to Orange City with Jesse and Nader.


Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

Still Laughing - 2023

I’m not sure what next Thursday’s flowertography will be, maybe more tulips or maybe pictures from my yard. We will have to wait and see!

Des Moines & Louisa County Aux. – Vol. 3

Today is Russell’s birthday, so I need to wish Russell a happy birthday, so happy birthday Russell!


Civil Rights Museum

I’m not sure I’ve seen Russell in person since before the pandemic. That seems like something that should be remedied. Either way, I hope your birthday is filled with all the joy you can handle.

+++++++

Time to continue with the auxiliary images from my trip to Des Moines County and Louisa County to harvest their town signs. Last time we left off, we were in Grnadview. After that, I took US-61 down to Wapello.


Louisa County

Louisa County - Wapello
Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Wapello

Louisa County - Toolesboro
Toolesboro

Louisa County - Toolesboro

Louisa County - Toolesboro

Louisa County - Toolesboro

Louisa County - Toolesboro

Louisa County - Toolesboro

Louisa County - Oakville
Oakville

Louisa County

Louisa County

Louisa County

Louisa County - Morning Sun
Morning Sun

Louisa County - Morning Sun

Louisa County - Morning Sun

Louisa County - Morning Sun

Louisa County - Morning Sun

Louisa County - Morning Sun

Louisa County - Morning Sun

Louisa County

Louisa County

Louisa County

So we should probably discuss some of the history in some of these pictures.

Here is some information on the Toolesboro Mounds:

The Toolesboro site consists of seven burial mounds on a bluff overlooking the Iowa River near where it joins the Mississippi River. The conical mounds were constructed between 200 B.C. and 300 A.D. by a local Hopewell group. They include some of the best-preserved and accessible remnants of Iowa’s Hopewell culture, a Middle Woodland people who hunted, gathered and gardened. At one time, there may have been as many as twelve mounds, but subsequent settlement and excavation have reduced that number to the present seven. As of yet, no village site near the Toolesboro mounds has been located, which is attributed to the shifting path of the Iowa River which has obliterated possible village sites on the flood plain over the last 2,000 years.

Of the seven mounds, only two are visible on the grounds of the Educational Center. The rest are off in the woods, and are separated by a wire fence from the Educational Center. One of the mounds maintained near the center, known as Mound 2, is the largest of the remaining mounds, measuring 100 feet in diameter and eight feet in height. This mound was possibly the largest Hopewell mound in Iowa.

And the Littleton Brothers… well…

The largest loss of life known in the history of all U.S. wars from any immediate family were the six local Littleton Brothers. All six were lost to the Civil War and the story just recently discovered and documented.

Here is some information on the Littleton brothers from the website (http://civil-war-picket.blogspot.com/):

James and Martha Littleton, the boys’ parents, moved to Louisa (Lew-I-zuh) County in about 1840, six years before Iowa became a state. The young Littleton brothers likely helped on a 200-acre farm.

Toolesboro used to be a busy hub, said Wagner, who lives in Illinois City, Ill.

The 1860 census that shows the family was listed as mulatto, which traditionally refers to a person with one white parent and one black parent. There’s debate today on that point.

The Littleton memorial will have a panel saying James came from free slave roots. “Records indicate Louisa County abolitionists had helped the family get settled there.”

But oral history within the Nicewanner family, as descendants of Permelia, states that James actually had Native American roots on one side, said Wagner.

Doug Jones, an archaeologist and Iowa Freedom Trail project manager for the State Historical Society of Iowa, said the little information he has on the Littletons is “quite intriguing.”

“There was a mulatto settlement, and we don’t know much about the settlement.”

Only one of the Littleton brothers, John, had children, and that daughter died before having any of her own. James and Martha Littleton died before the war.

Here’s what is known about each of the brothers’ service records (thanks to the Iowa Gold Star Military Museum for much of the following information):

— George Handy Littleton: George, 33, a cooper, volunteered from service from nearby New Boston, Ill., in March 1862. He is described as having brown eyes and dark hair and complexion. He was with Company B of the 65th Illinois Infantry. Captured by Confederates at Harpers Ferry, W.V., he was later paroled and discharged for disability in Chicago, according to official records, for a disease contracted before service. Woodruff said other material indicates Littleton got sick while in service. “We do not have the exact date or know where we died,” said Woodruff. The Columbus Gazette indicated George died soon after returning home. His grave has not been found.

— John Littleton: Enlisted in August 1862 with Company F of the 19th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He suffered a severe thigh injury during fighting at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, on Dec. 7, 1862. He died in Fayetteville, Ark., of wounds on December 18. It’s possible he may be buried among 800 unmarked graves at Fayetteville National Cemetery.

— Kendall Littleton: Also of the 19th Iowa, Kendall was killed in action on Dec. 7, 1862, at Prairie Grove, Ark. His remains were likely later moved to Fayetteville National Cemetery, and are marked as unknown.

— Noah Littleton: Survived the fighting at Prairie Grove but drowned March 1, 1863, in the White River in southern Missouri. His remains were disinterred and he is buried at Springfield (Mo.) National Cemetery. He, too, served in the 19th Iowa.

–Thomas Littleton: A member of the 5th Iowa, suffered a head wound at Iuka, Ms. He was taken prisoner in Chattanooga, Tenn., in November 1863. The private died of chronic diarrhea at Andersonville on June 16, 1864, and is buried at the national cemetery there.

— William Littleton: A corporal with the 8th Iowa, William was wounded at Shiloh in 1862 and died in December 1863 of diarrhea at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. He is buried at the national cemetery there.

There is still plenty more pictures left to share from this trip!