Category Archives: History

2010-05-09 & 2010-05-09

Most of the pictures in the folders 2010-05-09 & 2010-05-09 are from when I drove around with my Mom touring all the places she ever worked at. We did this tour right before she retired.

It made me think about if I were to retire tomorrow (dare to dream I know) what buildings I have worked in. If you don’t count bean walking or detasseling, I’ve worked in 6 buildings. Not counting the fact that I currently work from home. 3 of those buildings are still there. 3 of them have been torn down.

Here are the pictures:


Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

Happy Mother's Day, Slacker

WEEK 18 - WILD - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT

If you want to know what each of those places represent to my Mom’s work career, click on the appropriate link below.

By adding these pictures to the Photography 139 Gallery, I was able to restore the following historic “An Artist’s Notebook” entries to their original glory:

Happy Mother’s Day, Slacker

RWPE #18 – WILD

Next Saturday’s walk down memory lane will definitely involve my Mom.

Postcard Recreation Project – Fitch’s Dandruff

Today’s collection of recreated postcards are from downtown Boone area. When I recreated one of them, I did learn something about Boone history that I didn’t know. A fascinating, dry and itchy piece of Boone history.

The first picture is in downtown Boone, looking east down 8th Street from where the Fareway offices are.


Eighth St. East from and showing, P.O. - Original
Eighth St. East from and showing, P.O. – Original

Eighth St. East from and showing, P.O. - Redux
Eighth St. East from and show. P.O. – Redux

If I had to take a stab as to when this postcard was produced, I would say either 1907 or 1908 or maybe 1909. On January 28, 1907 the Butler House (a hotel) burned down. That hotel would be the first building east of the old Boone Post Office, which is the first building on the north side of Eight Street in the picture. The Butler House was a three story building. That spot was replaced by the Hotel Holst. It was a four story structure that was built from 1909-1910.

A personal opinion, but the old post office was a much cooler looking building than the post office building that would replace it and is still in use to this day.

The second picture is from a postcard that I’m not sure why anybody would want it. It is simply a picture of Tama Street looking north from the intersection with 4th Street.


Tama Street, Boone, Ia Original
Tama Street, Boone, Ia – Original

Tama Street, Boone, Ia Redux
Tama Street, Boone, IA – Redux

Not much to say about the history in this postcard. It does appear that most of the houses in this postcard are still standing, which is good, because it made it easy to find the location for this recreation pretty easy.

The final postcard recreation is a postcard of a business that I didn’t know ever existed. Which makes sense, because it was gone 50 years before I was born.


The Fitch Ideal Dandruff Cure Co's Building Postcard Original
The Fitch Ideal Dandruff Cure Co’s Building – Original

The Fitch Ideal Dandruff Cure Co's Building Postcard Redux
The Fitch Ideal Dandruff Cure Co’s Building Postcard – Redux

Here is some information about The F.W. Fitch Company from Wikipedia:

Fitch founded F.W. Fitch Company in Boone, Iowa, in 1892, and also owned a barbershop. Fitch’s first product was a hair tonic labeled “Ideal Hair Grower and Dandruff Cure.” Later products included the “Fitch scientific scalp treatment.”

Fitch moved his business to Des Moines at 15th and Walnut Streets in 1917; this district, F. W. Fitch Company Historic District, is now on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Fitch Company sponsored a national radio broadcast, The Fitch Bandwagon, from fall 1938 to spring 1948. It had with three different formats. The first featured many popular musical acts in its early years, including Cab Calloway, Ozzie Nelson, Tommy Dorsey and Guy Lombardo. The second was a variety show starring Cass Daley that featured popular bands between skits. The third and best-remembered version starred Phil Harris and Alice Faye for a single and final season; they later spun The Fitch Bandwagon into their long-running show, The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show.

The company did well throughout the early 20th century and during World War II but saw a decline in sales after the war due to the loss of military contracts.

In 1949, Fitch sold The F.W. Fitch Company to Grove Laboratories in St. Louis. The former F. W. Fitch Company building is now owned by Exile Brewing Company.

I found some more information on Fitch in a “The Boone News Republican” article from September 13, 1965.



Even though Fitch left Boone over 100 years ago, you can still see where the word FITCH used to hang on the front of the building over the front door.


Fitch Dandruff

Even though the building is starting to be in poor shape…


Fitch Dandruff

Fitch Dandruff

It is still in use as a dance studio and apartments. It is on the corner of Keeler and 7th Street.

Next time we tackle THE POSTCARD RECREATION PROJECT, it will probably involve the library.

Postcard Recreation Project – Boone Biblical College

I would understand if people were somewhat disappointed with these POSTCARD RECREATION PROJECT images. Because, spoiler, the building in these postcards that I recreated doesn’t exist any longer. It was demolished a long time ago. This won’t be the last time this happens. I mean, just wait until we get to the Holst Hotel images…

This time I decided to recreate two pictures of the Boone Biblical College. I wanted to find out lots of fascinating history about the Boone Biblical College. It still sorta exists. What is left of the Boone Biblical College church is now shared with Stonebridge Church. There is still a church building there that Stonebridge and Boone Biblical congregations share. There is an old building to the south of it. I’m not really sure what is in it any longer, but it used to be a men’s homeless shelter.

Crawford Hall, the other remaining building from the Boone Biblical College’s heyday was sold recently. I think that somebody is turning that into apartments, but that is at least 35% conjecture.

There is also a Boone Biblical College Cemetery, but it isn’t accessible by road and is on private land, therefore I have never seen it.

The only other things I can really tell you about the Boone Biblical College is that they used to have a good sized orphanage, they were given the old courthouse when Boone County decided to replace the courthouse, and they used to run a local radio station with the call letters KFGQ, which is where I used to listen to the radio show “Unshackled”.

I struggled with this postcard because the building in it doesn’t exist any longer. It took me longer than I care to admit to figure that out. There is a building that still stands that looks similar and I thought that was it for a period of time. Obviously modified over the years, but the same building. However after examining some maps and pictures from a series Boone News Republican articles by Ed Mondt, I figured out first, that this building no longer exists and then after further examination, where it once sat.

Postcard No. 4


Boone Biblical College
Original

Boone Biblical College
Redux

I sepia toned my image to give it an older look to it.

Postcard No. 5


Boone Biblical College
Original

Boone Biblical College
Redux

The original Boone Biblical College Building was on the southeast corner of West 2nd Street and State Street. I’m not sure when these postcards were made, but it was definitely before 1915, because some of those Ed Mondt photos I found were dated 1915 and the building that still exists are in those photos.

Here are some of those images:


Boone Biblical College
From 1915. You can see the existing building in the picture.

Boone Biblical College
A picture of the Children’s Home, which I gather was an orphanage. This building also no longer exists. Seems to be an empty lot now.

Boone Biblical College
This map of the Boone Biblical College complex is from 1916. You can see where the orphanage was located. Where they put the old courthouse and where their church was located. There is still a church there, but it is not the same building.

Boone Biblical College
The Boone News Republican article isn’t clear whether or not this map is from 1925 or 1950. But you can see the orphanage is now a Boy’s Home. There is an Infant’s Home and a new Girl’s home. The building that would become Crawford Hall and is still standing.

Boone Biblical College
I include this picture because you can see the old courthouse in the background.

Boone Biblical College
In this picture, you can see the original building and the original Tabernacle

I feel like this project is going to cause me to join the Boone Historical Society. Which is okay, now that their reputation has been restored, it seems.

Rodan139: Kate Shelley’s Bridge Remains

A couple weeks ago I followed the trail from the Kate Shelley Railroad Museum to the remains of the bridge that she crossed to save all those lives all those years ago.

If you don’t know the story of Kate Shelley, it goes something like this from the Wikipedia page:

On the afternoon of July 6, 1881, heavy thunderstorms caused a flash flood of Honey Creek, washing out timbers that supported the railroad trestle. A pusher locomotive sent from Moingona to check track conditions crossed the Des Moines River bridge, but plunged into Honey Creek when the bridge fell away at about 11pm, with a crew of four — Edgar Wood, A. P. Olmstead, Adam Agar, and Patrick Donahue.

Kate heard the crash, and knew that an eastbound express passenger train was due in Moingona about midnight, stopping shortly before heading east over the Des Moines River and then Honey Creek. She found two surviving crew members, Edgar Wood and Adam Agar, and shouted that she would get help, having to cross the Des Moines River bridge along the way. Although she started with a lantern, it went out, and she crawled the span on her hands and knees with only lightning for illumination. Once across, she had to cover about two miles on ground to the Moingona depot to sound the alarm. She then led a party back to rescue Edgar and Adam. Edgar, perched in a tree, grasped a rope thrown to him, and came ashore hand-over-hand. Adam couldn’t be reached until the floodwaters began to recede.[6] Pat Donahue’s body was eventually found in a cornfield a quarter mile downstream from the bridge, but A .P. Olmsted was never found. The passenger train was stopped at Scranton, with about 200 aboard.

Only the remains of the bridge are left as this set of railroad tracks was abandoned a long time ago. A lot of people think the bridge that she crossed is the Kate Shelley Memorial High Bridge, but that bridge was actually built decades later. The construction of that bridge ultimately doomed the railroad line that went through Moingona.

This map of the railroads from 1908 shows where these tracks went from leaving Boone to entering Ogden.



As near as I can tell, there is only one picture of the bridge that Kate Shelley did cross out there. It is very small:



From what I can tell, the bridge she crossed was replaced in 1894. If you go out to the remains now, there are a couple of the stone supports left, but the structures that held up the middle of the bridge had been replaced with concrete supports. Now I’m not an archaeologist, but I believe that the piles of stone that are found near the base of the concrete supports are what remains of the stone supports that they replaced. I also believe that the remains of the wood box that would’ve been built to hold the river back while they built the concrete support can also be found near the center concrete support.

All of that is 100% conjecture on my part, but I think it makes sense. You can only see these things when the river is crazy low. It was crazy low when I went out there a couple weeks ago.

If you want to get the remains of the bridge, you go to the Kate Shelley Railroad Museum and then walk the trail that goes along where the old railroad tracks were until you get to the Des Moines River. With apologies to Wikipedia, I’d guess it is closer to a mile rather than 2 miles. See map:



Any way, here are some pictures I took out there with Rodan139:


Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

Rodan 139: Kate Shelley's Bridge Remains

I will be going out there again in the near future for part of THE POSTCARD RECREATION PROJECT in the near future. Let me know if anybody is up for a short hike.

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This is your reminder that this week’s theme for THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE is FRAMED:


WEEK 268 - FRAMED
FRAMED

A FRAMED image is an image where the subject of your picture is framed by objects that create negative space around it.

Happy photo harvesting!

Postcard Recreation Project Reboot

Several years ago Jen suggested that for a photo project, I “recreate” old postcards. I loved the idea and I did it for exactly one postcard. Then did absolutely nothing else. For years. While I was on my vacation, I decided to start that project up again. I think I underestimated how difficult it might actually be to do well. I’m not sure my first (okay second) attempt at is necessarily done well.

In fact, in retrospect, I learned that I need to do a little more research before actually leaving my house and going out there to take the picture, to deliver on what I’m trying to do. For example, one of the pictures that was meant for today’s reveal, I definitely have to do again. I was not far enough west on 8th Street.

My goal is to go about near where the original postcard was taken, approximate the focal length of the original postcard, and then in editing deliver on the spirit of the original style of the postcard. Obviously, none of these will be a perfect recreation. In particular, the exact focal length will definitely be off. However, I think as long as I’m in the ballpark, I will be satisfied.

Postcard No. 2


Story Street from Ninth South Original
Original

Story Street from Ninth South Redux
Redux

This picture is looking south down Story Street, from the intersection with 9th Street. The original is more of an illustration than a photo, so I tried to make it look like an illustration in the editing. Making it bright and colorful. Like it probably was originally (I’m guessing) rather than how it has faded over the years.

Postcard No. 3


Story Street, North from Sixth Street
Original

Entrance to McHose Park
Redux

This picture postcard is looking north up Story Street from near Sixth Street. I really struggled with this one because I’m guessing this picture is probably from the 1950s. I am surprised by how many of the buildings in the original picture are gone. On that corner of 6th and Story used to house Vogler-Nieman Chevy, Buick and Pontiac. Plus a Champlin Oil. There was also a small building that sold popcorn there was well.

Here is a look at a couple old photos from a Boone News Republican article by Ed Mondt of that intersection:



1958


1940

If a guy wasn’t going to open a donut shop in his spare time, he could do worse than bringing back the popcorn shack.

Postcard No. 4


Entrance to McHose Park
Original

Entrance to McHose Park Redux
Redux

This postcard is a picture of the entrance to McHose Park. Not much has really changed much. There is a stop sign now. The road has been paved. There is a new McHose Park sign. The park was closed at the time I took the picture because of derecho damage. In the editing, I put a slight sepia tone to try to match the original.

I think I’m going to try to do these in sets of 3. The next set of 3 will probably involve the Boone Biblical College, Ledges State Park, and the location of Boone’s old post office.

WPC – WEEK 265 – SELF-PORTRAIT

I need to start by wishing everybody a happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day. I don’t have a picture to represent this holiday, but I do have a suggestion on a way to celebrate it.

I suggest listening to THIS LAND podcast by Crooked Media. It is pretty incredible and infuriating and addictive. Click on the link below:

This Land

A synopsis of the podcast:

Patrick Murphy was convicted of murder by the state of Oklahoma in 2000. But defense attorneys soon discovered that his conviction may have been based on a lie. Hosted by Rebecca Nagle, an Oklahoma journalist and citizen of the Cherokee Nation, this podcast will provide an in depth look at how a cut and dry murder case opened an investigation into half the land in Oklahoma and the treaty rights of five tribes. Follow along to find out what’s at stake, the Trump administration’s involvement, the larger right wing attack on tribal sovereignty and how one unique case resulted in the largest restoration of tribal land in US history.

If you find that interesting, and you should because it is fascinating, click on the link above!

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We did it! WooHoo! 54 straight weeks of double digit submissions!

But you didn’t come here to listen to me talk all tommyrot about the submission rates. You came to see the submissions:


WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - MONICA HENNING
Monica Henning

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - KIM BARKER
Kim Barker

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - DAWN KRAUSE
Dawn Krause

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - MICHELLE HAUPT
Michelle Haupt

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - TAMARA PETERSON
Tamara Peterson

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT
Christopher D. Bennett

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - MICKY AUGUSTIN
Micky Augustin

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - SHANNON BARDOLE-FOLEY
Shannon Bardole-Foley

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - CATHIE RALEY
Cathie Raley

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - JEN ENSLEY-GORSHE
Jen Ensley-Gorshe

WEEK 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT - DERRICK GORSHE
Derrick Gorshe

But enough dwelling on the past. Time to look to the future. We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future! This week’s theme:


WEEK 266 - BLACK AND WHITE
BLACK AND WHITE

BLACK AND WHITE! What a great theme! In fact, I think you all know by now that is it my favorite theme! BLACK AND WHITE photography was my first love. Still my greatest love. What is a BLACK AND WHITE image? Literally any subject, as long as it is taken in BLACK AND WHITE.

BLACK AND WHITE has been a theme six times. It was not included in the first set of 52 themes. A terrible oversight and I blame Vest. Here is a look back at the six times BLACK AND WHITE was a theme:

RWPE Y2 #27 – BLACK & WHITE

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE – WEEK 14 – BLACK AND WHITE

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE – WEEK 74 – BLACK & WHITE

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE – WEEK 133 – BLACK & WHITE

WPC – WEEK 202 – BLACK & WHITE

WPC – WEEK 251 – BLACK AND WHITE

I look forward to seeing your new interpretations!

HOUSEKEEPING

A MESSAGE FROM THE PHOTOGRAPHY 139 RULES DIVISION
The picture has to be taken the week of the theme. This isn’t a curate your pictures challenge. This is a get your butt off the couch (my personal experience) and put your camera in your hands challenge. Don’t send me a picture of you next to the Eiffel Tower, when I know you were in Iowa all week. I will point out that I have let that slide some in the past. I will not in the future. Since it is literally about the only rule.

Your submission needs to be emailed to bennett@photography139.com by 11 AM on the Monday of the challenge due date.

OR

I now allow people to text me their submissions. In the past, I had made exceptions for a couple people that aren’t real computer savvy, even though it was an inconvenience for me and required at least 3 extra steps for me. I am now lifting that embargo because I have a streamline way of uploading photos. I’m not giving out my phone number, but if you have it, you can text me.

It should be pointed out that this blog auto-publishes at 12:01 on Mondays. So it wouldn’t hurt to get your picture in earlier.

That is it, them’s the rules.

A MESSAGE FROM THE PHOTOGRAPHY 139 SHAMELESS SELF-PROMOTION DIVISION

Nobody showed class, taste, and sophistication this week by signing up for a Photography 139 email subscription. I’ll try and do better next week.

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That’s all I got for today, so if the good Lord’s willin’ and the creek don’t rise, we will commune right here again next Monday. Hopefully it will be a very monochrome Monday!

Maybe I’m a Man and Maybe I’m a Lonely Man

I need to start today by wishing Shawn a happy birthday. Happy birthday Shawn!


The Juncks - 2016

Loser - Happy

Lockner Wedding Candid

Junck Family Portrait - 2016

I hope your birthday is as wonderful as you want it to be!

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I do love pictures of SIGNS. My sister-in-law Laura once told me that this makes me a hipster. She is wrong about that, but even if it did make me a hipster, I’d still love pictures of signs. Battered. Beat up. Barely hanging on. My kind of SIGNS. With that in mind, here are the alternate pictures for last week’s THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE theme SIGNS:


WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

WPC - WEEK 264 - SIGNS ALTERNATE

I also took a couple pictures of unincorporated towns in Boone County:


Centerville, Iowa (Boone County)
Centerville, Iowa
Unincorporated

Ridgeport, Iowa
Ridgeport, Iowa
Unincorporated

Here is an interesting fact about Ridgeport. It was originally called Mineral Ridge. It took that name from the ridge that the town sits on. It was giving that name because the surveyors that were exploring the area, their compass wasn’t working correctly. The figured that this was because the ridge was filled with minerals. Turns out that they just had a broken compass. At least this is what I read in the latest issue of “Trail Tales”.

I wish more of these unincorporated communities had signs like Centerville. I looked for one in Logansport and didn’t find one. Also looked for some kind of marker where Zenorsville was once located, but found nothing. However, of all the unincorporated communities in Boone County, the lack of any kind of marker for Jordan makes me the saddest. Not just because of my family connection (I also have a family connection to Centerville) to Jordan, but because of its historical significance because of the Jordan tornado. C’est la vie!

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This is your reminder that this week’s theme for THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE is SELF-PORTRAIT:


WEEL 265 - SELF-PORTRAIT
SELF-PORTRAIT

A SELF-PORTRAIT is simply a picture where the photographer and the subject are the same person. Obviously, there are some creative ways to get around that, if you don’t like take pictures of yourself. Even if that doesn’t make sense to anybody else.

Happy photo harvesting!

Happy Birthday!

Thought that this would be a good day to share the balance of pictures I took while I was tooling around Boone County looking for my BLACK AND WHITE and Happy Independence Day photos.


I Know Who did This...

Boone County Historical Marker

Boone County Historical Marker

Boone County Historical Marker

Boone County Historical Marker

Boone County Historical Marker

The sign says:

On July 31, 1943 a U.S. Army Air Force B-24 Bomber Ser. No 41-29052 carrying a crew of 5, crashed at this site during a server thunderstorm killing everyone on board.

This marker is placed in their memory.
Pilot 1st Lt. Melvin S. Meeker
Co-Pilot 2nd Lt. Samuel Levitt
Bombardier 2nd Lt. Matthew J. Radosevich
Engineer T/Sgt James M. Parker
Radio Man T/Sgt Thomas J. Leyshon

The crew was on a navigation training flight from Topeka ARM Air Force Base, Topeka, Kansas, to Duluth, Minnesota at the time of the crash.

Iowa Military Aviation Heritage Museum Ankeny, Iowa

I’ve corrected some of the unfortunate spelling errors on the sign.

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There are a ton of birthdays up in the Photography 139 Universe! Let me start with my nephew Logan. Happy birthday Logan!


Logan Graduation

Good Friday - 2009

Bennett Family Photo Shoot - 2017

Iowa State vs. Oklahoma State

I hope your birthday was as amazing as you wanted it to be! Get some rest. You’re going to need it!

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I also need to wish a happy birthday to Derrick. Happy birthday Derrick!


October 28, 2017

Last Ottumwa Day

WEEK 139 - MUSIC - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT


I hope your birthday was as incredible as you wanted it to be!

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If it is Derrick’s birthday, that also means that it is Jill’s birthday. I haven’t talked to Jill in years, but I still wish her a happy birthday!


Iowa State Fair - 2011

9 Emotions Project - Jill Gorshe

Ottumwa

I hope your birthday was as joyous as you hoped it would be.

2010-01-19 & 2010-01-25

Happy 4th of July everybody! This holiday celebratory picture is a bit different.


Happy 4th of July - 2020

This historical marker commemorates the crew of a U.S. Army Air Force B-24 Bomber that were killed when their plane crashed in Boone County during a training flight during WWII.

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The pictures in the folders 2010-01-19 & 2010-01-25 are from a couple different PERSONAL PHOTO PROJECT(s). One is of a Sara through the window in my entry way. The other is a picture of some family Bibles. There is also a picture from the 3rd ever WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE. The theme was PEOPLE.


Hearts Beat High with Joy Alternate

Hearts Beat High with Joy Alternate

Hearts Beat High with Joy Alternate

Hearts Beat High with Joy Alternate

Hearts Beat High with Joy Alternate

Hearts Beat High with Joy Alternate

WEEK 3 - PEOPLE - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT

The Lovely Silhouette

By adding these pictures to the Photography 139 Gallery, I was able to restore the following historic “An Artist’s Notebook” entries to their original glory:

RWPE #3 – PEOPLE
Personal Photo Project of the Week No. 5
Personal Photo Project of the Week No. 6

Next Saturday’s walk down memory lane will involve Willy and some flowers.

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Happy Friday the 13th everybody! Considered to be a very unlucky day, but considering how bad of a shape our country is in right now, I don’t want to invite any more bad luck. So I am going to celebrate by watching a Friday the 13th movie tonight. Not sure which one yet, but maybe the 3-D one or maybe the one with Corey Feldman or maybe my favorite one, which involves a soundtrack littered with one “great” Alice Cooper song after another.

I’ve always believed that Friday the 13th was an unlucky day because those camp counselors decided to sneak off and “get it on” instead of watching that little special needs boy. I hope it was good for them, because he drowned and now we all have to suffer on this day… forever.

Turns out, that isn’t why Friday the 13th is considered unlucky. Turns out, maybe we don’t even know why it is considered unlucky. There are just theories on it, but nobody really knows.

One theory is that there were 13 guests at the Last Supper. Jesus and his 12 apostles. Judas betrayed him and on the next day, a Friday, Jesus was crucified.

This created a longstanding superstition that I’ve never heard of that having 13 guests at a table is a bad omen. This is why the Methodist Men always seat tables for 8 people. Not really, but it would be cool if we did.

But do bad things happen on Friday the 13th, besides the bad things that happen to camp counselors?

In 1964, the infamous Kitty Geovese murder.
In 1970, 300,000 people were killed in Bagladesh by a cyclone.
In 1996, Tupac was murdered.

Seems like a pretty terrible track record to me. So let me just celebrate this Friday the 13th with some of my favorite Tupac lyrics:

With all this extra stressing
The question I wonder is after death, after my last breath
When will I finally get to rest through this suppression?
They punish the people that’s asking questions
And those that possess, steal from the ones without possessions
The message I stress: to make it stop study your lessons
Don’t settle for less – even the genius asks his questions
Be grateful for blessings
Don’t ever change, keep your essence
The power is in the people and politics we address
Always do your best, don’t let the pressure make you panic
And when you get stranded, and things don’t go the way you planned it
Dreaming of riches, in a position of making a difference
Politicians and hypocrites, they don’t wanna listen
If I’m insane, it’s the fame made a brother change
It wasn’t nothing like the game
It’s just me against the world

Happy Friday the 13th. I hope you enjoy your favorite Friday the 13th movie tonight!

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Last Saturday morning I spent some time at McHose Park photographing the junk pile that is on the backside of the park for THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE theme JUNK. Why there is a small junkyard on the backside of probably the most beautiful city park in the Cyclone State is a bit of a mystery. This is what I believe happened:

A long, long time ago, I can still remember how, the city dump used to be on South Division Street. Eventually Boone decided that maybe the dump shouldn’t be in town and built a landfill outside of town a few miles. They needed to do something with the junk that was in the city dump and rather than move it or recycle it, they just shoved it all down the ravine on the backside of McHose Park. Problem solved. Given a choice between doing something smart and something lazy, people will usually take the lazy option. Over the years, rain and snow and wind and mud has slowly moved all that junk deeper and deeper into McHose Park. The beautiful part of it is that there is a lot of water run off that goes through those rusted out fridges, washing machines, barrels, tires, and cars through an abandoned old train bridge and right into the water of Honey Creek.

Here are some pictures of some beautiful old JUNK that didn’t make the cut for THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE on Monday:


Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

Hurting My Head from Things that I Said

What looks like was an old milk crate is something that I could see my sister Carla using in decorating somehow. I thought about grabbing it for her, but I’m not sure what the legality is of just taking junk from a city park is. But I did put it in a place where I can find it if I decide to push the limits.

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This is your reminder that this week’s WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE theme is WATER:


WEEK 235 - WATER
WATER

A WATER image is any image where WATER is an important part of the composition of the picture.

Happy photo harvesting!