Category Archives: History

Benton County Auxiliary Images – 2

Today I’m sharing the balance of the images from when Jesse and I drove around Benton County and harvested their town signs. But first I want to share another bit of family history that I found amongst the genealogy papers when we’ve been going through stuff at my Mom’s house.

I think this episode of family history is called, Grandpa Bennett goes Straight Gangsta on a Teacher.

History of the Elegy Poem

This Elegy poem was written by John W. Bennett in 1920. The poem was sent to his teacher named Mr. Jefferson. The reason for the poem goes like this:

First, J.W.B. had received an “A” on a Sociology test from Mr. Jefferson. Later the teacher wanted him to do some errand or problems he had done before. They got in an argument over this and John refused. The teacher took away his A and told him he would not graduate unless he would apologize. John wen to the principal and found out he could graduate without this credit. He never returned to class, but sent this poem to Mr. Jefferson.

Ellen Leininger
Gerald D. Bennett
2-16-78

Here is the poem:

Elegy Written to P.S.J.

Do you really know what happened
Twas just the other day
Jeff got real kind-hearted
And in Sociology gave me “A”
But to tell the truth about it
It di me little good,
For he and his partners changed it
For the worse not for the good.
Poor old Jeff got real angry
But to me said not a word,
But let it in on the Juniors and Seniors
When he to them in a herd,
And he told them all about me
In that cowardly way of his,
And to them gave all my characteristics
When I wasn’t there to tell them his.
Oh! he told them how I needed
His old credit in Sociology,
But I’ve got along alright so far
And don’t need his help By Gee!
And when he leaves Old Luther High
Oh! won’t it be just fine
As I’ve got eight more just like him
And with him they just make nine
And he said to get back into his class
I would have to apologize,
But before I’ll stoop before him
He’d better grow in size
By J.W.B.

Here are the scans of the documents:



Straight gangsta!

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Here are the rest of the auxiliary images from Jesse and I’s trip to Benton County:


Benton County - Shell Rock
Shellsburg, Iowa

Benton County - Shell Rock

Benton County - Shell Rock

Benton County - Norway
Norway

Benton County - Norway

Benton County - Norway

Benton County - Watkins
Watkins

Benton County - Watkins

Benton County - Watkins

Benton County - Watkins

Benton County - Watkins

Benton County - Watkins

Benton County - Watkins
I love that the lights are inside the fence.

Benton County - Watkins

Benton County - Blairstown
Blairstown

Benton County - Blairstown

Benton County - Luzerne
Luzerne

Benton County - Belle Plaine
Belle Plaine

Benton County - Belle Plaine
Jumbo Well info below.

Benton County - Belle Plaine

Benton County - Belle Plaine

Benton County - Belle Plaine
I want to eat here someday.

Benton County - Belle Plaine

The Jumbo Well was a well that was once considered “The Eighth Wonder of the World”. The short version of the story is that they drilled a well in Belle Plaine into and they hit the wrong part of the aquifer and they couldn’t stop water shooting out for fourteen months. The well shot out water at 3,000 gallons of water per minute.

Here is a little interesting tidbit on the guy who dug the well and then promptly fled the town:

William Weir

The town of Belle Plaine, Iowa, contracted a well digger from Monticello, Iowa, to drill an artesian well to provide water and fire protection to a section of the town. The sum of $175 was offered to “bring in” the well and work by William Weir and his sons began upon receipt. They were not strangers to the citizens of Belle Plaine for they had recently successfully drilled several other artesian wells in the same city.

What happened thereafter made the news, not just in Iowa but from coast to coast! The Belle Plaine artesian well erupted into a monster — more than 3,000 gallons of water per minute boiled into the streets, threatening to flood the homes and businesses in its path. Weir and his sons worked frantically to stem the flow and cap the well, until all their supplies were exhausted and darkness was falling. William Weir and his sons left Belle Plaine, presumably the terrified townspeople thought, to gather necessary material with which to stop the furious flow of water. Weir and his sons were never seen again in the town of Belle Plaine. Fourteen months and many thousands of dollars later “Jumbo” was brought under control by experts from as far away as Chicago.

By [the spring of] 1890 William was drilling in Cherokee, Iowa, so apparently the Belle Plaine disaster had not harmed his business. Custom at that time demanded the well digger must drink the first cup from any newly dug well. He honored this tradition, contracted typhoid fever, and died June 1890 of what was often called in those days, “the well digger’s disease.

The maximum flow of water is estimated to have been at 5,000,000 to 9,000,000 gallons per day. This enormous flow of water caused the surrounding wells to stop flowing. The attempt to control the well continued from August 26, 1886 to October 6, 1887 when it was finally accomplished. The well was finally tamed by sinking one large pipe with a smaller one inside it, the space between was caulked, and the outside cavity filled with rock and cement. A granite marker now identifies Jumbo at the intersection of Eighth Street and Eighth Avenue, Belle Plaine, Iowa.

Unfortunately, I did not get a picture of the rock, but I’m sure I will go through Belle Plaine again on a future town sign harvesting trip.

We also harvested the towns of Poweshiek County on this trip. Those pictures will be shared in a separate entry.

Is Anybody Goin’ To San Antone

I’ve decided to share some of the family history notes that I find now and again while going through some of the genealogy stuff at my Mom’s house. None of it is quite as weird as the 6 part story on my Grandma Bennett’s brief third marriage, but I hope some of you find it interesting. Today I’m sharing a little bit about a town in Iowa (that doesn’t really exist any more) that was named after one of the earliest members of my Mom’s Dad’s family to immigrate to the United States.

A Town Named Paris (Bunch) IA

This is probably the only town in Iowa with two names. It owes its schizophrenic personality to the stubborness of the U.S. Post Office and the Rock Island Railroad.

About 100 years ago, a local resident named Jackson Paris donated land for the Rock Island Railroad to build tracks and a depot here. The depot and the town that grew around it was named Paris.

About 20 years later, Paris became big enough for a post office, but postal officials told the town father they would have to come up with another name.

A town in Linn County had already registered the post office as Paris.

So the town renamed Bunch, after a local doctor, and everyone was happy except the railroad.

Railroad officials refused to recognize Bunch, because if they did, they would have to change all their timetables and other records. Postal official(s) refused to recognize Paris because doing so would mean changing their records.

So, the railroad station remained Paris, the post office was named Bunch, and the town was known as Paris (Bunch).

To add further confusion, Davis County legal platts have always called the town Paris, and residents of Paris (Bunch) have called their town Bunch.

The railroad eventually pulled its tracks out of Paris and the Post Office closed its Bunch office, leaving Paris (Bunch) with neither a railroad nor a post office.

Now all that remains are a few old houses and antique filled general store.

The problems of Paris (Bunch) is about to resolve itself. In a couple of years, this will be a ghost town.

I’m not sure when this article appeared in the newspaper, but Paris (Bunch) is definitely a ghost town now. All that remains (I’ve read) is the cemetery. The Paris in Linn County didn’t do much better. It is now an unincorporated community.

I haven’t been to Davis County for THE TOWN SIGN PROJECT yet, but when I do, I will definitely seek out this old ghost town and visit the cemetery and the graves of some of my ancestors.

Here are the scans of the documents where I gathered this information:



I’m sure I will run across another family nugget that I just have to share while going through these papers soon.

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Here is another collection of pictures I took of my Mom’s flowers. These were taken on April 25. Once again, mostly tulips.


Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Is Anybody Goin' To San Antone

I still have lots of flower pictures from my Mom’s house to share.

Benton County Auxiliary Images – 1

A few weeks back I hit the open road with Jesse and we harvested the town signs of Benton County and Poweshiek County. This collection focuses primarily on Benton County, although there are some pictures at the end from Buchanan County.

Jesse was the first Town Sign Assistant to use the map and eschew GPS in his navigator duties. It was quite impressive to see and I believe his ability to read a map gives me hope for the world.

Here are the first set of auxiliary images from the road trip:


Benton County - Van Horne
Van Horne

Benton County - Van Horne

Benton County - Garrison
Garrison

Benton County - Garrison

Benton County - Vinton
Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Vinton

Benton County - Mount Auburn
Mount Auburn

Benton County - Mount Auburn
Jesse didn’t get a Pepsi. The machine didn’t even have a power cord.

Buchanan County - Brandon
Brandon (Buchanan County)

Buchanan County - Brandon

Buchanan County - Brandon

Buchanan County - Brandon

Buchanan County - Brandon

Buchanan County - Brandon

Buchanan County - Brandon
No riffraff allowed!

I definitely really enjoyed Vinton. Any town with tons of artwork is my kind of town. It is definitely on my list of towns to visit again when I have more time. They also recently installed a glow-in-the-dark path that I want to checkout.

There are plenty more pictures from the road trip still to share.

Tama County Auxiliary Images – 2

Here is the final chapter in the storage of my Grandma Bennett’s brief third marriage:

Handschin Killer Commits Suicide At Reformatory

Sioux City, Feb. 15

Mrs. Martelle McPeek, 29 year-old blonde, who last January 11th shot her lover after being jilted, committed suicider early today in the woman’s reformatory at Rockwell City by hanging herself with a pair of cotton stockings.

Supt. Pauline Johnston said Mrs. McPeek was by a guard. The county coroner said Mrs. McPeek died of strangulation and that her neck was not broken.

Mrs. McPeek entered the institution January 27th. She had been sentenced to ten years when she pleaded guilty to a charge of second degree murder.

The charge against her was filed after the death of Maurics Handschin, 36-year-old packing house employee as a result of a bullet wound in the abdomen.

Formerly of Boone

The late Mr. Handschin was formerly of Boone and had married here only shortly before the fatal shooting. His underal services were held in this city.

Claimed by Husband

Rockwell City, Feb. 15

Mrs. Martelle M. McPeek, 29, committed suicide at the Iowa Women’s Reformatory, to which she was sentenced for 10 years for killing Maurice Handschin in Sioux City last January 11.

Mrs. McPeek’s body was found hanging from the top of a window. She had strangled herself to death with her stockings. Her husband, William McPeek of Sioux City claimed her body.

Handschin lived at the McPeek residence in Sioux City several years before leaving there to marry a Boone divorcee. Mrs. McPeek contended she had planned to divorce her husband and marry Handschin.

Here is a copy of the newspaper article:



While that concluded this episode of sharing some of my family history that I discover going through some genealogy stuff, it won’t be the last.

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This is the rest of the auxiliary images from my trip to Tama County to harvest their town signs. The highlight of this trip was the winding stairs in Traer.


Tama County - Clutier
Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Dysart
Dysart

Tama County - Traer
Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Traer

Tama County - Lincoln
Lincoln

Tama County

Grundy County - Conrad
Conrad (Grundy County)

Grundy County - Conrad

Tama County - Garwin, Iowa
Garwin

Tama County - Garwin, Iowa

Tama County

So many auxiliary images still to go through, but that is it for Tama County.

Dropped

Here is Part 5 of the story of my Grandma Bennett’s brief third marriage.

Sentence in Shooting of M. Handschin

Sioux City Woman Given 10 Years At Women’s Reformatory at Rockwell City

Sioux City, Jan. 26 – Mrs. Martelle McPeek, 29, of Sioux City, today was under sentence of 10 years in the women’s reformatory at Rockwell City for the slaying of Maurice W. Handschin, 37, packinghouse worker.

Mrs. McPeek was sentenced late yesterday by Dist. Judge D.C. Browning, after she pleaded guilty to murder charges. The court decided the offense was second-degree murder.

Mrs. McPeek confessed shooting Handschin on January 11 because he had married another woman after promising to marry her.

She testified that Handschin, who died late Wednesday of a bullet wound through his abdomen, had threatened to beat her after his return from Boone with his bride the former Mrs. Berniece Kessler, mother of a 7 year-old daughter.

Mrs. McPeek said that after friends told her of Handschin’s threats, she changed the door locks on her home where Handschin had been a roomer for six years.

Following the shooting, William McPeek, the accused woman’s husband, filed suit for $130 room rent against Handschin.

Here is the newspaper article:



I will share Part 6, the final part, of this story on Sunday.

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Back earlier in the year, I had an idea for decorating my hallway with a photomosaic self-portrait. I have since abandoned this photo project, but thought I would share some of the self-portraits I took that were test shots for what would be the base image for the photomosaic that will never exist.


Abandoned Photomosaic

Abandoned Photomosaic

Abandoned Photomosaic

Abandoned Photomosaic

At some point, I might try a different photomosaic project, but it won’t be in my hallway.

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This is your reminder that this week’s THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE theme is ARCHITECTURE:


WEEK 306 - ARCHITECTURE
ARCHITECTURE

Architecture! What a great theme for Year 8 of THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE.

But what is an ARCHITECTURE image? Simply put ARCHITECTURE photography is the photographing of structures. Buildings mostly, but there are other types of structures. Bridges. Towers. Bleachers. Try to capture a beautiful construction or parts of it in an interesting way.

Think on the following quote when you think about creating your ARCHITECTURE image:

Even a brick wants to be something.
-Louis Kahn

Happy photo harvesting!

(I’m So) Afraid Of Losing You Again

Here is Part 4 of the story of my Grandma Bennett’s brief third marriage.

M. Handschin Funeral Rites Here Jan. 25th

Native of Boone Died in Sioux City
Formerly Employed by North Wester R. R.

Relatives, neighbors and friends paid their final respects to the memory of the late Maurice W. Handschin at funeral services held here Sunday afternoon. Dr. Edwin A. Briggs was in charge of brief rites at Schroder’s funeral home, followed by the main service at First Methodist church.

His text was Psalms 23:4 “Yes, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff comfort me.:

A solo, “Beautiful Dreamer” was sung by Mrs. Kenneth McIlvain. The hymn “The City Foursquare” was sung by a male quarter, H.J. Van Ness, Ken Goodrich, Kenneth Hakes and L.R. Johnson. Royal Duckworth accompanied the singers at the organ.

In charge of floral tributes were Mrs. Thomas Ogilvie, Mrs. E.R. Byers, Miss Leone Stiner and Mrs. Kenneth Crawford.

Pall bearers were Albert Hatt, Boyd Rothman, Levi Van Meter, Melvin Shadock, Glendon Johnson and Maurice Cox.
Internment was in Linwood Park cemetery, east.

Born in Boone

Maurice William Handschin, son of Adolph and Mertil Handschin, was (b)orn in Boone, IA, May 6, 1903 and passed away in a hospital at Sioux City, Ia., at 11:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 24, 1940.

He received his education in the Boone schools and for years was employed by the Chicago & Northwester in Boone, Ia., In 19933 he was moved to Sioux City where he was employed by the Swift Packing company.

His Survivors.

December 31, 1939, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Bernice Kessler. He was baptized on January 23, 1940.

Those who remain to mourn his passing are his wife, Norman Lee, a son by former marriage; a step-daughter, Barbara, and five sisters, Mrs. Ralph Spratt, Mrs. Carl Westberg of Boone; Mrs. Clarence Ades of Des Moines, Ia.; Mrs. Art Howd of Webster City, Ia., and Mrs. Ollie Mabee of Parker, S. D., and three brothers, Warren of Boone, Ia., Art of St. Paul, Minn., and Harry of Oregon, and also a number of nieces and nephews.

Here is the newspaper article:



I will share Part 5 of this story tomorrow.

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Here is another collection of pictures from my Mom’s yard. I took these on April 24, 2021. Almost exclusively tulips, but one picture of a peony in there.


Whispering Beauty - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

Still Laughing - 2021

So many more flower photos left to share!

Tama County Auxiliary Images – 1

Here is Part 3 of the brief third marriage of my Grandma Bennett. This article is in particularly bad shape, so there is some guessing with what it says.

Handschin, Formerly of Boone, Dies After Being Shot, Sioux city.

A (man) shot by a jealous woman at Sioux City the night of January 11, Maurice (Mose) Handschin, 37, formerly of Boone, died at 11 o’clock Wednesday night in a hospital at the northwest Iowa city.

His remains are being accompanied to this city by his wife to whom he was married here shortly after the first of the year. Funeral services and interment will be in Boone, the body to arrive late Thursday.

Handschin was born and grew up here, leaving about 10 years ago for Sioux City where he had been employed by the Swift packing. (Handschin) at one time was a North Western employee here.

A number of his three surviving brothers and five surviving sisters reside here. The survivors are Warren Handschin of Boone, Art Handschin of Minneapolis and Harry Handschin of Oregon, Mesdames Ralph Spratt and Carl Westberg of Boone. Clarence Ades of Des Moines, Art Howd of Webster City and Ollie Mabee of Parker, S.D.

Sioux City, Jan. 25 – First degree murder charges were filed in Sioux City today against Mrs. Martelle McPeek, as the result of the death last night of Maurice W. Handschin of a bullet wound.

Chief of Detectives Tom Farley said Mrs. McPeek signed a statement that she shot Handschin on January 11 when (learned he had married another woman).

Mrs. McPeek (was jailed on an open charge since the shooting, which occurred inside the home of Handschin and his bride of a few days. fired two shots, one entering Handschin’s abdomen. A physician said death was caused by infection in the blood stream. The bullet tore seven holes in his intestines and stomach. (Coroner said an autopsy would be held later today.)

Handschin had been living with Mr. and Mrs. Mcpeek six years and for most of that time, according to investigating authorities, he and Mrs. McPeek had carried on a love affair with the knowledge of her husband.

At Christmas time, Handschin left Sioux City, saying he was going to remarry his former wife. He returned shortly after New Years with a Mrs. Handschin who was not his former wife but a Boone divorcee, Mrs. Bernice Kessler, with a 7 year-old daughter.

On the night of the shooting, Mrs. McPeek was driven to the couple’s home by a friend, Bud Ackerly, and forced open the door when Mrs. Handschin answered her knock. When Ackerly heard the shots he ran in and seized Mrs. McPeek’s pistol and called the police.

Born in Boone

Mrs. McPeek said she planned to obtain a divorce and marry Handschin.

Several days after the shooting, McPeek filed a petition for a landlord’s attachment against Handschin seeking a judgment for $150 unpaid room rent.

Handschin was born at Boone on May 6, 1903 and had lived in Sioux City for six years. Survivors include a son, Norman.

Here is the newspaper article:



Part 4 of the story tomorrow.

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This is a reminder that today is the deadline to enter the Pufferbilly Days Photo Contest.


Pufferbilly Days Photo Contest Flyer - 2021

If the Boone County Fair Photo Contest that I just judged on Saturday is any indication, we might be desperate for entries. Therefore the deadline is somewhat of a “soft deadline”. However, I wouldn’t push it more than a week.

To download the rules and entry form, click on the link below:

Entry Form

Good luck!

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Today seems like a good day to share some of the auxiliary images I took while harvesting the town signs of Tama County:


Tama County - Tama
Tama

Tama County - Toledo
Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Toledo

Tama County - Chelsea
Chelsea

Tama County - Chelsea

Tama County - Chelsea

Tama County - Chelsea

Tama County - Chelsea

Tama County

Tama County

Tama County - Vining
Vining

Tama County - Vining
So many all-you-can-eat testicles eaten in this building!

Tama County - Vining

Tama County - Elberon
Elberon

Tama County - Elberon

Tama County - Elberon

Tama County - Clutier
Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

Tama County - Clutier

There is still one more collection of images from Tama County left to share!

Town Sign Project: Calhoun County

Here is Part 2 in the story of my Grandma Bennett’s second marriage.

Jealous Woman Shoots Ex-Boone Man
Sioux City, Jan. 12

Maurice Handschin, 37, packing house worker, was in critical condition in a Sioux City hospital today after being shot through the body last, night assertedly by Mrs. Martell McPeek, 29.

Police said Mrs. McPeek, enraged because she hoped to wed Handschin, who married another woman 10 days ago, forced her way into his home while Hanschin and his bride were eating dinner, took a revolver from her purse and fired twice. One bullet struck him in the abdomen.

Transfusions were given Handschin in an effort to save his life.

From Boone

Mrs. McPeek said she had made plans to divorce her husband and marry Handschin. Mrs. Handschin whose 7-year-old daughter witnessed the shooting, came to Sioux City a few days ago from Boone, Iowa, where she obtained a divorce four years ago.

As physicians were dressing Handschin’s wounds in his home, Mrs. McPeek stood calmly beside him and said: “I’m sorry Maurice, but I just couldn’t stand it.”

Bud Ackerly, who brought Mrs. McPeek to Handschin’s home in his automobile, rushed into the house after hearing the shots and wrested the gun from her. He was not held.

Filing of charges was delayed pending outcome of Handschin’s condition.

Married Here

Acquaintances here Friday said Mrs. Handschin is the former Mrs. Bernice Kessler of Boone who was married to Handschin here about 10 days ago. They said she is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O.M. Needham. Handschin formerly lived here.

Held in Jail

Maurice Handschin, 37, a packing house worker, was in critical condition today from bullet wounds police said were inflicted by Mrs. Martelle McPeek, 29, in the presence of his bride of twelve days.

The shooting occurred last night at Handchin’s home. Before his marriage at Boone, January 1st, Handschin had lived for six years at the McPeek home.

Police said the woman was enraged because Handschin did not marry her. She is being held in jail.

Here is the newspaper article:



Part 3 of the story tomorrow.

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A few Saturdays back I took a solo trip to Calhoun County to harvest their town sign collection. I would have to say, at the aggregate level, Calhoun County might have the strongest collection of town signs. It is definitely a Top 3 County on a list that I haven’t made and have no intention of making.

Here are some facts about Calhoun County:

+ Population is 9,744 (2019 estimate). Making it the 76th most populous county in Iowa. Below Sac County and above Humboldt County.
+ The county seat is Rockwell City.
+ The largest town is Lake City.
+ Was formed on January 15, 1851 from land originally named Fox County.
+ Named for John C. Calhoun, the 7th Vice President (Jackson), Senator, Secretary of State, Secretary of War, and U.S. Representative. An absolute terrible human being and maybe the worst person to have an Iowa County named for them. Really, Calhoun County should go back to being Fox County. Calhoun was such a terrible person that Andrew Jackson (also a terrible human being) regretted not having him executed. Calhoun was Jackson’s Vice President!
+ Home of the Manson crater, here an asteroid or comet nucleus struck the Earth during the Cretaceous Period, approximately 74 Ma (million years ago). It was one of the largest known impact events to have happened in North America.
+ Major highways are: US-20, IA-4, IA-7, and IA-175.
+ Adjacent counties are: Pocahontas, Webster, Greene, Carroll, and Sac.
+ Population peaked in 1900 at 18,569.

Calhoun County has a gorgeous courthouse:


Calhoun County Courthouse
The Calhoun Courthouse in Rockwell City, Iowa

The Calhoun County Freedom Rock is located in Rockwell City, Iowa:


Calhoun County Freedom Rock

Calhoun County Freedom Rock

Calhoun County Freedom Rock

Calhoun County Freedom Rock

With Calhoun County conquered, this is the updated Photography 139 Conquest Map:


Town Sign Project - 28 Counties
PURPLE=COMPLETED

28 counties completed. 28.3% of the Cyclone State conquered.

Here are the town signs of Calhoun County:


Lake City, Iowa
Lake City, Iowa
WELCOME TO LAKE CITY
EVERYTHING BUT A LAKE
Population: 1,727

Rockwell City, Iowa
Rockwell City, Iowa
ROCKWELL CITY
THE GOLDEN BUCKLE ON THE CORN BELT
Population: 1,709

Manson, Iowa
Manson, Iowa
MANSON
MAKING AN IMPACT
Population:1,690

Pomeroy, Iowa
Pomeroy, Iowa
Pomeroy
We Welcome You for a Day or a Lifetime!
Population: 662

Farnhamville, Iowa #3 - East Side
Farnhamville, Iowa
FARNHAMVILLE
TURN RIGHT 1/2 Mi.
IF YOU CAN’T STOP…
AT LEAST WAVE!!
Population: 371

Lohrville, Iowa
Lohrville, Iowa
LOHRVILLE
Better Not Bigger
Population: 368

Lytton, Iowa
Lytton, Iowa
LYTTON
Population: 315

Somers, Iowa
Somers, Iowa
Welcome to Somers
Population: 113

Knierim, Iowa
Knierim, Iowa
Welcome To KNIERIM
ESTABLISHED 1899
Population: 60

Rinard, Iowa
Rinard, Iowa
CITY OF RINARD PARK
Population: 52

Jolley, Iowa
Jolley, Iowa
WELCOME TO JOLLEY
THE FIELD OF SCREAMS
Population: 41

Yetter, Iowa
Yetter, Iowa
YETTER IA TOWN HALL
Population: 34

Calhoun County seems like a good county to answer a few questions that have been thrown my way recently. One question is:

Question 1: If a town doesn’t have an obvious town sign, what is the hierarch for finding a substitute/alternate to a traditional town sign?

The rankings go like this:

1. Townhall Sign
2. Community Center Sign
3. Post Office Sign
4. Park Sign
5. School Sign
6. City Limits Town Sign
7. Town Bulletin Board
8. Railroad Sign
9. Bike Trail Sign
10. Sign on a Mailbox (apparently)

Then way down at the bottom…

Dead Last: DOT Sign

Another question I’ve received a couple times late is:

Question 2: If a town has multiple town signs, how do you determine which one is the primary town sign and which ones are alternate town signs?

Answer: The primary town sign is the indicated mostly by geography. It is the first town sign you see when you come into town. If the town has different town signs as you enter the town from different directions, then the primary town sign is determined by which town sign resides on the road that is the busiest. What road would most people come into town on? For example for Boone, that would be US-30. One more factor is who put the sign up? Is it a church welcoming people into the town or was it put up by the town itself. The sign put up by the town itself is the winner for primary town sign.

Now that you have that information, it is time to answer the question of what town has the worst town sign in Calhoun County. I think that is pretty clearly Rinard. It is just an interestingly scrolled set of words on the shelter of their park. Having to use a townhall sign for Yetter also isn’t great.

But the real question is, who wins Best in Show for Calhoun County? There are many great town signs in Calhoun County. At one time I though Farnhamville would be the runaway winner. However, Pomeroy has a great sign. Jolley has a great sign. Lake City has a great slogan on their sign, but the design is a bit boring. It might come as a surprise. Maybe a bit of an upset, but I’m giving best town sign to Manson.


Manson, Iowa
Manson – Best in Show – Calhoun County

There were many towns in Calhoun County that had alternate signs. Here are the alternate signs of Calhoun County:


Yetter, Iowa
Yetter – Alternate

Rockwell City, Iowa
Rockwell City – Alternate

Pomeroy, Iowa
Pomeroy – Alternate

Manson, Iowa
Manson – Alternate

Manson, Iowa
Manson – Alternate
Jolley, Iowa
Jolley – Alternate

Lohrville, Iowa
Lohrville – Alternate

Farnhamville, Iowa #3 - West Side
Back of Farnhamville Sign

Farnhamville, Iowa #2
Farnhamville – Alternate

Farnhamville, Iowa #1
Farnhamville – Alternate

Here is the current list of Best in Shows:


Fontanelle, Iowa
Best in Show – Adair County

Audubon, Iowa
Best in Show – Audubon County

Norway, Iowa
Best in Show – Benton County

Moingona, Iowa
Best in Show – Boone County

Manson, Iowa
Best in Show – Calhoun County

Coon Rapids, Iowa
Best in Show – Carroll County

Murray, Iowa
Best in Show – Clarke County

Ricketts, Iowa
Best in Show – Crawford County

Dexter, Iowa
Best in Show – Dallas County

Popejoy, Iowa
Best in Show – Franklin County

Scranton, Iowa
Best in Show – Greene County

Beaman, Iowa
Best in Show – Grundy County

Menlo, Iowa
Best in Show – Guthrie County

Stanhope, Iowa
Best in Show – Hamilton County

Ackley, Iowa
Best in Show – Hardin County

Bradgate, iowa
Best in Show – Humboldt County

Lynnville, Iowa
Best in Show – Jasper County

Lucas, Iowa
Best in Show – Lucas County

East Peru, Iowa
Best in Show – Madison County

Pleasantville, Iowa
Best in Show – Marion County

Haverhill, Iowa
Best in Show – Marshall County

Bondurant, Iowa
Best in Show – Polk County

Malcom, Iowa
Best in Show – Poweshiek County

Collins, Iowa
Best in Show – Story County

Tama, Iowa
Best in Show – Tama County

Creston, Iowa
Best in Show – Union County

Badger, Iowa
Best in Show – Webster County

Woolstock, Iowa
Best in Show – Wright County

The next time we check in on THE TOWN SIGN PROJECT, we will visit Sac County.

WPC – WEEK 305 – MUSIC

While we have been working on sorting things at my Mom’s house, we recently have come through a whole pile of genealogy stuff. While sorting through it, I thought I would share a bit of family history from my Dad’s side of the family. It is a story I’ve known, but never knew all the details that well. Through a series of 6 newspaper clippings, I’m going to share the story of my Grandma Bennett’s brief second marriage.

Handschin-Kessler Wedding
Sunday, December 31st

After morning services at the Central Church of Christ Sunday, December 31st, a wedding ceremony was solemnized in which Mrs. Bernice Kessler, daughter of Mr. anad Mrs. O.M. Needham, 1517 Sixth street, became the bride of Mr. Maurice Handschin of Sioux City, Iowa. The Rev. G. Harvey Sutton officiated at the double ring ceremony in his study. Attending the couple were Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Spratt of Boone.

For her wedding, the bride wore an attractive dress of plaid sheer wool with black accessories.

Later in the day, a wedding supper was served at the Spratt Restaurant, seventeen being present for the event. Both the bride and bridegroom attended Boone High school and have many friends in Boone who will be interested in reading of their marriage. The bride is employed at the Rollins Hosiery Mill and Mr. Handschin is employed by Swift Packing company at Sioux City, where the couple will make their home.

The articles are printed on thermal paper, it appears, and are not in good shape. Here is what it looks like:



There will be more to the story tomorrow.

+++++++

The language of MUSIC seemed to speak to several people this week. Of course, that is MUSIC to my ears, or maybe MUSIC to my eyes.

But you didn’t come here to listen to me talk all tommyrot about participation rates. You came to see the submissions:


WEEK 305 - MUSIC - TERESA KAHLER
Teresa Kahler

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - TERESA KAHLER
Teresa Kahler

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - TERESA KAHLER
Teresa Kahler

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - TERESA KAHLER
Teresa Kahler

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - TERESA KAHLER
Teresa Kahler

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - KIM BARKER
Kim Barker

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - KIM BARKER
Kim Barker

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - TAMARA PETERSON
Tamara Peterson

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - SHANNON BARDOLE-FOLEY
Shannon Bardole-Foley

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT
Christopher D. Bennett

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - BILL WENTWORTH
Bill Wentworth

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - CATHIE RALEY
Cathie Raley

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - MICHELLE HAUPT
Michelle Haupt

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - ELIZABETH NORDEEN
Elizabeth Nordeen

WEEK 305- MUSIC - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 305- MUSIC - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 305- MUSIC - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 305 - MUSIC - MIKE VEST
Mike Vest

But enough dwelling on the past. Time to look to the future. We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future! This week’s theme:


WEEK 306 - ARCHITECTURE
ARCHITECTURE

Architecture! What a great theme for Year 8 of THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE.

But what is an ARCHITECTURE image? Simply put ARCHITECTURE photography is the photographing of structures. Buildings mostly, but there are other types of structures. Bridges. Towers. Bleachers. Try to capture a beautiful construction or parts of it in an interesting way.

Think on the following quote when you think about creating your ARCHITECTURE image:

Even a brick wants to be something.
-Louis Kahn

RULES

The picture has to be taken between 12:01 PM today and 11 AM next Monday. This isn’t a curate your photos project. This is a get your butt off the couch (unless you are taking your picture from the couch) and take pictures challenge.

You can send your images to either bennett@photography139.com OR you may text them to my Pixel 5.

That is all I got, so if the good Lord’s willin’ and the creek don’t rise, we will all be sharing our idea of MUSIC in this place that is created by a computer architect next Monday.

WPC – WEEK 304 – HISTORY

Lots of people decided to make HISTORY by taking a HISTORY image this week. I understand that it can be a bit difficult for people that aren’t like me. You see, it is easy for me cause I’m making HISTORY every day.

But you didn’t come here to listen to me talk all tommyrot about participation rates. You came to see the submissions:


WEEK 304 - HISTORY - TERESA KAHLER
Teresa Kahler

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - JOE DUFF
Joe Duff

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - JOE DUFF
Joe Duff

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - TAMARA PETERSON
Tamara Peterson

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - BECKY PARMELEE
Becky Parmelee

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - BILL WENTWORTH
Bill Wentworth

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - CHIRSTOPHER D. BENNETT
Christopher D. Bennett

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - KIM BARKER
Kim Barker

WEEL 304 - HISTORY - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEL 304 - HISTORY - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - MICHELLE HAUPT
Michelle Haupt

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - CARLA STENSLAND
Carla Stensland

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - MICKY AUGUSTIN
Micky Augustin

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 304 - HISTORY - MIKE VEST
Mike Vest

But enough dwelling on the past. Time to look to the future. We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future! This week’s theme:


WEEK 305 - MUSIC
MUSIC

BY THE WAY: WEDNESDAY IS THE LAST CITY BAND CONCERT OF THE YEAR IN BOONE.

MUSIC! What a great theme for Year 8 of THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE!

But what is a MUSIC photo? A MUSIC photo is any picture that’s composition includes anything related to MUSIC. A person playing MUSIC. Sheet MUSIC. A MUSICal instrument. Anything involved in the creation of MUSIC.

While thinking on your MUSIC photo, consider this quote:

Music is the only language in which you cannot say a mean or sarcastic thing.
-John Erskine

Think on that quote, and you will no doubt create a stunning MUSIC image for next MONDAY.

RULES

The picture has to be taken between 12:01 PM today and 11 AM next Monday. This isn’t a curate your photos project. This is a get your butt off the couch (unless you are taking your picture from the couch) and take pictures challenge.

You can send your images to either bennett@photography139.com OR you may text them to my Pixel 5.

That is all I got, so if the good Lord’s willin’ and the creek don’t rise, we will all be sharing our idea of MUSIC in this place that like to think it is a metaphorical melody next Monday.