Category Archives: Ruins

Wide Angling

This is a collection of some more of the first pictures I took with the Tamron wide angle lens. some are at the courthouse. Some around the high bridges. Some around the Kate Shelley Museum:


Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

Wide Angling

I do love that wide angle zoom lens!

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This is your reminder that this week’s THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE theme is LIGHT:


WEEK 296 - LIGHT
LIGHT

A LIGHT image is pretty simple. It is merely a picture where LIGHT plays a major compositional element. A wise person might argue that any picture they take is a LIGHT picture because all photography really is, is the capturing of LIGHT. But warning, when you take a picture of LIGHT, don’t face your camera straight towards a bright LIGHT.. You will surely damage it. The camera. The LIGHT will be just fine.

Think about the following song lyric when you are contemplating your LIGHT image:

I saw the light, I saw the light
No more darkness, no more night
Now I’m so happy no sorrow in sight
Praise the Lord, I saw the light
-Hank Williams

Happy photo harvesting!

Hardin County Auxiliary Images

Back in February I cruised around Hardin County harvesting town sign photos. This was a solo trip. These are some of the non-town sign pictures I took on the trip.


Hardin County
New Providence – This round gym was recently featured in a movie.

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County
Gifford

Hardin County
Union

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County
Whitten

Hardin County
Eldora

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County
Steamboat Rock

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County
Ackley

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

Hardin County

I really liked Hardin County. There is more than one thing there I would like to go back and photograph again in the future.

2010-07-19

Most of the pictures in the folder 2010-07-19 are of the remains of a pair of downtown Boone buildings that caught fire. Then there are some flower pictures as well.

Have a look:


First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

First Act

Nature's Amen - 2010

WEEK 28 - CALM - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT

By adding these pictures to the Photography 139 Gallery, I was able to restore the following historic “An Artist’s Notebook” entries to their original glory:

RWPE #28 – CALM

Dr. The Incidental Gardener

First Act

Next Saturday’s walk down memory lane will involve Jen and Derrick.

Wright County Auxiliary Images

Buckle up, this one could be a long post.

I need to start by wishing Dawn a happy birthday. Happy birthday Dawn!


9 Emotions Project - Dawn Krause

Photo of the Day 0089 - July 30, 2014

Bonne Finken

Josh Davis Band

I hope your birthday is as amazing as you want it to be!

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I also need to wish a happy birthday to Baier. Happy birthday Baier!


Baier Tenderloin Road Trip

Photo Journal - Page 56 Reject

Cardiff Giant - Fort Dodge

Baier Family Photo Shoot - 2009

I hope your birthday is as amazing as you want it to be!

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It is beyond time I share the photos from my trip around Wright County with my Mom and Teresa harvesting the town signs of… well Wright County. Although some of these pictures are also taken in Humboldt County, Hardin County, Franklin County, and Story County. But I want to start with a little history lesson about Woolstock. The birthplace of George Reeves.

For those of you don’t know, George Reeves was the first television Superman. He also appeared in GONE WITH THE WIND. But after playing Superman he was typecast and had difficulty getting other roles. He died tragically and mysteriously. It was ultimately ruled a suicide, but there are many that think he was murdered. His death was the focus of the 2006 movie HOLLYWOODLAND. He was portrayed by Ben Affleck.

Here is a little bit on George Reeves and Woolstock from the Superman Supersite:

On January 5th, 1914, George Keefer Brewer was born to Helen Lescher Brewer and Don Brewer of Woolstock. At the time of his birth his parents had been renting 2 front rooms in the home of the Fischers. So and so was the midwife that delivered little George in the Fischer home on that cold January day. Marie Claude was his babysitter (Her experiences with George will be coming soon).

Helen Lescher, George’s mother, came from Galesburg, Illinois, which is also where she met George’s father, Don Brewer, while he was at Pharmacy school. She was a child from a wealthy and prominent Galesburg family. Her move to Woolstock was made after she had become pregnant with George and came around the time of her marriage to Don Brewer in August of 1913. She disliked Woolstock because of its small town setting and her desire for more attention and fancy flare that she could not receive in it.

After the birth of George, Don soon acquired a small bungalow home on present day Cecilia Street. Their move there did not tame the flames already drawn by Helen, and Helen became disappointed that Don didn’t want to achieve more then what he already had with his pharmacist job in a small rural community. After a year or so, she would request separation and a divorce. There is talk that Helen ended up staying at the Woolstock Hotel on the west corner of Main Street (now it would have been located on the corner of Herman, Nellie, and Alice Streets across from the grain silos/elevator) during the separation. After the divorce, Helen eventually moved with George to Pasadena, California, near her sister, where she would meet her 2nd husband, Frank Bessalo. Frank eventually adopted George, and Helen made up fake documents about George’s past and told him that his real father committed suicide. Later George would meet his father unexpectedly during a show that George acted and toured with during the 1940s, after the success of Gone with the Wind (George played Stuart Tarleton). George was surprised that his father was alive, and was angry at Helen. He would never meet with his father after that because he thought too much time had gone by.

Don Brewer, himself, was born and grew up around the area of Woolstock in near by Webster City. He continued with business at the Reed and Brewer Drug Store, but would eventually move to Mason City, Iowa.

Well, his mom was a real piece of work.

Here are the pictures from the road trip:


Wright County
Woolstock, Iowa

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Humboldt County
Thor, Iowa – I wonder is this sign works. Cause I have all sorts of doubts.

Wright County
Goldfield, Iowa

Wright County

Wright County
Clarion, Iowa

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County
Belmond, Iowa

Franklin County
Alexander, Iowa

Wright County
Dows, Iowa

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County
“Abundent”?

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County
Outhouse!

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Wright County

Hardin County
Alden, Iowa

Hardin County

Hardin County
Buckeye, Iowa

Hardin County

Bald Eagle
North of Zearing, Iowa a few miles. Bald Eagles, the turtles of the sky.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

I believe Jasper County is next up for the sharing of auxiliary images.

National Building Fire

On February 7, an apartment in the Boone National Building caught fire. Unfortunately, one person died in the fire and 24 people were left homeless. I happened to be out and about shortly after the fire had been put out by the fire departments of Boone, Ogden, Ames, Stratford, and Gilbert. I took a few pictures of the aftermath.


National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

National Building Fire

It was one of those February mornings where the temperature was well below zero. I can’t imagine what it was like for the people involved in the fire. Hopefully everybody has since found new housing or have been able to return to their aparments.

2010-07-01 & 2010-07-05

There weren’t many pictures in the folder 2010-07-05, so I decided to combine it with 2010-07-01 Skydive 2.

The pictures in the folder 2010-07-01 Skydive 2 are from when Shannon did get to go skydiving. The pictures from 2010-07-05 Market are from when I did a quick spin around Beaver, Iowa to look at the ruins of the once mighty city. Just kidding, Beaver was never mighty, but at least it was the embarrassment that it has become.


Welcome to Beaver, Iowa

Welcome to Beaver, Iowa

Welcome to Beaver, Iowa

Welcome to Beaver, Iowa

Welcome to Beaver, Iowa

Welcome to Beaver, Iowa

WEEK 26 - MARKET - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

The Dumbest Thing Shannon Bardole has Ever Done

By adding these pictures to the Photography 139 Gallery, I was able to restore the following historic “An Artist’s Notebook” entries to their original glory:

WELCOME TO BEAVER, IOWA

RWPE #26 – MARKET

In the post about Beaver, Iowa, there is an interesting discussion in the comments section about which town is worse: Beaver or Dana.

Next Saturday’s walk down memory lane will definitely involve flowers.

Hamilton County Auxiliary Images

Today I’m sharing images I took while tooling around Hamilton County harvesting signs for THE TOWN SIGN PROJECT. There aren’t many of them because I actually had already harvested most Hamilton County town signs before this little road trip.


Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County
Might be wonder why I took this picture of this bench in Williams. It is because these people went to my church. I was surprised to see their name on a bench in another town.

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

Hamilton County

There are a few more counties worth of auxiliary photos to share out there.

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This is your reminder that this week’s theme for THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE is BLACK:


WEEK 281 - BLACK
BLACK

A BLACK image can be of all sorts of things. Things that are BLACK. Things that make you feel BLACK. Or it could be BLACK humor. Who knows, let your BLACKest imagination run wild!

I don’t have a movie quote for you to meditate on this week, instead I have song lyrics from Johnny Cash:

Well, you wonder why I always dress in black
Why you never see bright colors on my back
And why does my appearance seem to have a somber tone
Well, there’s a reason for the things that I have on

I wear the black for the poor and the beaten down
Living in the hopeless, hungry side of town
I wear it for the prisoner who has long paid for his crime
But is there because he’s a victim of the time

I wear the black for those who’ve never read
Or listened to the words that Jesus said
About the road to happiness through love and charity
Why, you’d think He’s talking straight to you and me

Well, we’re doing mighty fine, I do suppose
In our streak of lightning cars and fancy clothes
But just so we’re reminded of the ones who are held back
Up front there ought to be a man in black

I wear it for the sick and lonely old
For the reckless ones whose bad trip left them cold
I wear the black in mourning for the lives that could have been
Each week we lose a hundred fine young men

And I wear it for the thousands who have died
Believing that the Lord was on their side
I wear it for another hundred thousand who have died
Believing that we all were on their side

Well, there’s things that never will be right I know
And things need changing everywhere you go
But ’til we start to make a move to make a few things right
You’ll never see me wear a suit of white

Ah, I’d love to wear a rainbow every day
And tell the world that everything’s okay
But I’ll try to carry off a little darkness on my back
‘Til things are brighter, I’m the Man In Black

Meditate on the words of the greatest country singer, while thinking about how to create your BLACK image.

Happy photo harvesting!

Loess Hills Road Trip

I’d like to just start with saying how completely impressed I was with Amanda Gorman, this nation’s first ever youth poet laureate and the poem she read at the inauguration on Wednesday. Wow! Goosebumps. I was one the people that rushed to Amazon and pre-ordered her book and made it the best selling book on Amazon. It doesn’t come out until September, so to tide myself over, I thought I would just put her inauguration poem down here, so I could find it and read it anytime I want:

THE HILL WE CLIMB

When day comes we ask ourselves,
where can we find light in this never-ending shade?
The loss we carry,
a sea we must wade
We’ve braved the belly of the beast
We’ve learned that quiet isn’t always peace
And the norms and notions
of what just is
Isn’t always just-ice
And yet the dawn is ours
before we knew it
Somehow we do it
Somehow we’ve weathered and witnessed
a nation that isn’t broken
but simply unfinished
We the successors of a country and a time
Where a skinny Black girl
descended from slaves and raised by a single mother
can dream of becoming president
only to find herself reciting for one
And yes we are far from polished
far from pristine
but that doesn’t mean we are
striving to form a union that is perfect
We are striving to forge a union with purpose
To compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters and
conditions of man
And so we lift our gazes not to what stands between us
but what stands before us
We close the divide because we know, to put our future first,
we must first put our differences aside
We lay down our arms
so we can reach out our arms
to one another
We seek harm to none and harmony for all
Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true:
That even as we grieved, we grew
That even as we hurt, we hoped
That even as we tired, we tried
That we’ll forever be tied together, victorious
Not because we will never again know defeat
but because we will never again sow division
Scripture tells us to envision
that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree
And no one shall make them afraid
If we’re to live up to our own time
Then victory won’t lie in the blade
But in all the bridges we’ve made
That is the promise to glade
The hill we climb
If only we dare
It’s because being American is more than a pride we inherit,
it’s the past we step into
and how we repair it
We’ve seen a force that would shatter our nation
rather than share it
Would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy
And this effort very nearly succeeded
But while democracy can be periodically delayed
it can never be permanently defeated
In this truth
in this faith we trust
For while we have our eyes on the future
history has its eyes on us
This is the era of just redemption
We feared at its inception
We did not feel prepared to be the heirs
of such a terrifying hour
but within it we found the power
to author a new chapter
To offer hope and laughter to ourselves
So while once we asked,
how could we possibly prevail over catastrophe?
Now we assert
How could catastrophe possibly prevail over us?
We will not march back to what was
but move to what shall be
A country that is bruised but whole,
benevolent but bold,
fierce and free
We will not be turned around
or interrupted by intimidation
because we know our inaction and inertia
will be the inheritance of the next generation
Our blunders become their burdens
But one thing is certain:
If we merge mercy with might,
and might with right,
then love becomes our legacy
and change our children’s birthright
So let us leave behind a country
better than the one we were left with
Every breath from my bronze-pounded chest,
we will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one
We will rise from the gold-limbed hills of the west,
we will rise from the windswept northeast
where our forefathers first realized revolution
We will rise from the lake-rimmed cities of the midwestern states,
we will rise from the sunbaked south
We will rebuild, reconcile and recover
and every known nook of our nation and
every corner called our country,
our people diverse and beautiful will emerge,
battered and beautiful
When day comes we step out of the shade,
aflame and unafraid
The new dawn blooms as we free it
For there is always light,
if only we’re brave enough to see it
If only we’re brave enough to be it

Beautiful. Absolutely beautiful.

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Today I’m going to share what I would call auxiliary images from my road trip to the Loess Hills back in September. They are auxiliary because they were not taken at the Loess Hills and they also don’t fall into THE TOWN SIGNS PROJECT either. These are pictures I took on the way to the Loess Hills and on the way back.

I do want to start with a brief history lesson. It comes from a question I had to ask when I stopped at a historic marker on the trip. A historic marker honoring Merle Hay. I’m sure many of you have driven on Merle Hay’s road and shopped in his mall, but do you know who Merle Hay was?

I myself only knew that Merle Hay was a war hero of some kind, but I didn’t even know from what war and what he did. Take a look at this historic marker in the cemetery where he is buried:


Loess Hills Road Trip

When I saw this, I couldn’t figure out what was going on in the picture. So I researched it and while it is maybe obvious to some, I didn’t deduce that the guy carrying the fallen soldier was Uncle Sam. Carrying Merle Hay home.

So who was Merle Hay?

He was the first or one of the first Americans to die in WWI. Here is his story from the Wiki:

When the United States entered the First World War, Hay was young enough to avoid being drafted. With his father’s blessing, he voluntarily enlisted on May 9, 1917. He was among 8 men from Glidden who enlisted that day. They were first shipped to Fort Logan, Colorado, then to Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas. He was assigned to the 16th Infantry Regiment. On 26 June 1917, the regiment disembarked the troop ships in St. Nazaire, France, as part of the 1st Infantry Division. By November 1917, he was assigned to Company F along with Corporal James Bethel Gresham and Private Thomas Enright. They were posted in the trenches near the French village of Artois. In the early morning of 3 November 1917, the Imperial German Army attacked. After an hour of fighting, Hay, along with Corporal Gresham, and Private Enright were the first three casualties of the American Expeditionary Force.

Two days later, on 5 Nov 1917, Enright, Gresham, and Hay were buried near the battlefield where they had died. An inscription marked their graves: “Here lie the first soldiers of the illustrious Republic of the United States who fell on French soil for justice and liberty.” Their bodies were eventually returned to their families and reburied in the United States. Hay was then re-interred in July 1921 in West Lawn Cemetery in his home town of Glidden, Iowa. The West Lawn Cemetery was later renamed the Merle Hay Memorial Cemetery. An 8-foot monument commissioned by the Iowa Legislature marks his gravesite.

Remember that story, the next time you are driving down Merle Hay Road in Des Moines.

Here are the rest of the Loess Road Trip auxiliary photos:


Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip
I can’t figure out if this is brilliant, sacrilegious, brilliantly sacrilegious, or sacrilegiously brilliant. Hopefully there is a theologian out there that can assist me.

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip
This sign confuses me so much. So very much.

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip
I love this tiny mailbox so much. I want to bundle it up and take it home with me, but of course that is a federal crime.

Loess Hills Road Trip
Birthplace of Merle Hay – Now you know where he started and where he ended.

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

Loess Hills Road Trip

I wish I would have gotten better pictures of the ghost town that is Carrollton, but it was just pouring down rain when I rolled through there. But I’m sure I’ll get there again some day.

Here is another history fact for you:

The first American military casualty in WWII was also from Iowa. Robert M. Losey was born in Andrew, Iowa. He was killed in a German bombardment of Norway on April 21, 1940. If you are doing the math, that is well before the United States entered the war.

Also semi-interesting fact. Andrew, Iowa is in Jackson county. Jackson County is named after racist piece of trash Andrew Jackson. Andrew is also named after racist piece of trash Andrew Jackson. Double fail for that town.

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This is your reminder that this week’s THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE is HOBBIES:


WEEK 280 - HOBBIES
HOBBIES

HOBBIES can be all sorts of activities. Collecting things. Making things. Building things. Destroying things. So much, much more. Just remember the words of Norman Bates…

As you should know, the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock classic PSYCHO is tied for being my favorite movie of all-time. Think about the scene is PSYCHO where Marion Crane and Norman Bates are eating supper together in the backroom of the Bates Motel office, with all of the birds that Norman has stuffed.

INT. NORMAN’S PARLOR -(NIGHT)

In the darkened room, lit only by the light from the office spilling in, we see Norman placing the tray on a table. Mary comes to the doorway, pauses. Norman straightens up, goes to lamp, turns on the light.

Mary is startled by the room. Even in the dimness of one lamp, the strange, extraordinary nature of the room rushes
up at one. It is a room of birds. Stuffed birds, all over the room, on every available surface, one even clinging to
the old fashioned fringed shade of the lamp. The birds are of many varieties, beautiful, grand, horrible, preying. Mary
stares in awe and a certain fascinated horror.

CLOSE UP – THE VARIOUS BIRDS TWO SHOT – MARY AND NORMAN

NORMAN
Please sit down. On the sofa.

As Norman goes about spreading out the bread and ham and pouring the milk, we follow Mary across the room. She studies
the birds as she walks, briefly examines a bookcase stacked with books on the subject of “Taxidermy.”

CLOSE UP – THE BOOKS ON TAXIDERMY MED. CLOSE SHOT – MARY

She notices, too, the paintings on the wall; nudes, primarily, and many with a vaguely religious overtone.

Finally Mary reaches the sofa, sits down, looks at the spread.

MARY
You’re very… kind.

NORMAN
It’s all for you. I’m not hungry. Please go ahead.

Mary begins to eat, her attitude a bit tense. She takes up a small slice of ham, bites off a tiny bite, nibbles at it in the manner of one disturbed and preoccupied.

Norman gazes at her, at the tiny bite she has taken, smiles and then laughs.

NORMAN
You eat like a bird.

MARY
You’d know, of course.

NORMAN
Not really. I hear that expression, that one eats “like a bird,” is really
a falsie, I mean a falsity, because birds eat a tremendous lot.
(A pause, then explaining)
Oh, I don’t know anything about birds. My hobby is stuffing things…
taxidermy. And I guess I’d just rather stuff birds because… well, I hate
the look of beasts when they’re stuffed, foxes and chimps and all…
some people even stuff dogs and cats… but I can’t… I think only
birds look well stuffed because they’re rather… passive, to begin
with… most of them…

He trails off, his exuberance failing in the rushing return of his natural hesitancy and discomfort. Mary looks at him,
with some compression, smiles.

MARY
It’s a strange hobby. Curious, I mean.

NORMAN
Uncommon, too.

MARY
I imagine so.

NORMAN
It’s not as expensive as you’d think. Cheap, really. Needles, thread,
sawdust .. the chemicals are all that cost anything.
(He goes quiet, looks disturbed)

MARY
A man should have a hobby.

NORMAN
It’s more than a hobby… sometimes…
a hobby is supposed to pass the time, not fill it.

Happy photo harvesting!

WPC – WEEK 272 – RUINS

61 straight weeks! I had to rattle a couple of cages this morning,

But you didn’t come here to listen to me talk all tommyrot about participation rates. You came to see the submissions:


WEEK 272 - RUINS - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 272 - RUINS - CATHIE RALEY
Cathie Raley

WEEK 272 - RUINS - TAMARA PETERSON
Tamara Peterson

WEEK 272 - RUINS - KIO DETTMAN
Kio Dettman

WEEK 272 - RUINS - AARON BARNETT
Aaron Barnett

WEEK 272 - RUINS - CHRISTOPHER D. BENNETT
Christopher D. Bennett

WEEK 272 - RUINS - MICKY AUGUSTIN
Micky Augustin

WEEK 272 - RUINS - ELIZABETH NORDEEN
Elizabeth Nordeen

WEEK 272 - RUINS - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 272 - RUINS - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 272 - RUINS - ANDY SHARP
Andy Sharp

WEEK 272 - RUINS - DAWN KRAUSE
Dawn Krause

WEEK 272 - RUINS - JESSE HOWARD
Jesse Howard

But enough dwelling on the past. Time to look to the future. We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future! This week’s theme:


WEEK 273 - FOOD
FOOD

FOOD! What a great theme! But what is a FOOD image. A FOOD image is simply a picture of FOOD, FOOD preparation, people eating FOOD, or things that will become FOOD.

Here is a look at all the times in the past that FOOD was a theme:

RWPE #34 – FOOD

RWPE Y2 #15 – FOOD

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE – WEEK 123 – FOOD

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE – WEEK 189 – DESSERT

WPC – WEEK 197 – BREAKFAST

WPC – WEEK 226 – FOOD

I look forward to your new interpretations.

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HOUSEKEEPING

A MESSAGE FROM THE PHOTOGRAPHY 139 RULES DIVISION

The picture has to be taken the week of the theme. This isn’t a curate your pictures challenge. This is a get your butt off the couch (my personal experience) and put your camera in your hands challenge. Don’t send me a picture of you next to the Eiffel Tower, when I know you were in Iowa all week. I will point out that I have let that slide some in the past. I will not in the future. Since it is literally about the only rule.

Your submission needs to be emailed to bennett@photography139.com by 11 AM on the Monday of the challenge due date.

OR

I now allow people to text me their submissions. In the past, I had made exceptions for a couple people that aren’t real computer savvy, even though it was an inconvenience for me and required at least 3 extra steps for me. I am now lifting that embargo because I have a streamline way of uploading photos. I’m not giving out my phone number, but if you have it, you can text me.

It should be pointed out that this blog auto-publishes at 12:01 on Mondays. So it wouldn’t hurt to get your picture in earlier.

That is it, them’s the rules.

A MESSAGE FROM THE PHOTOGRAPHY 139 SHAMELESS SELF-PROMOTION DIVISION

Nobody showed class, taste, and sophistication this week by signing up for a Photography 139 email subscription. I’ll try and do better next week.

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That’s all I got for today, so if the good Lord’s willin’ and the creek don’t rise, we will commune right here again next Monday. Hopefully it will be a very foody Monday!

Town Sign Project: Greene County & Story County

I stated in a blog post on Sunday (that has some interesting information in the comments section – Click on this link: Town Sign Project: Boone County) that I’m going to start breaking these signs down by county. When I looked into it, I had already taken a picture of every incorporated town in Greene County. I was only missing two signs from Story County.

While I was snooping around Story County looking at the Unincorporated Communities of Fernald and Shipley, I made another decision to not seek out unincorporated communities in future searches. Not because I have a disdain for Unincorporated communities, but because basically they don’t have signs. If they do, it is only the DOT sign that points out that a community exists here. Moingona has really been the only exception here. So, unless I just happen to stumble across an unincorporated community or get a tip, they are out.

Here are the the town signs of Greene County (Population is based on 2010 Census):


Jefferson, Iowa
Jefferson, Iowa – 4,435

Grand Junction, Iowa
Grand Junction, Iowa – 824

Scranton, Iowa
Scranton, Iowa – 557

Churdan, Iowa
Churdan, Iowa – 386

Rippey, Iowa
Rippey, Iowa – 292

Paton, Iowa
Paton, Iowa – 236

Ralston, Iowa
Ralston, Iowa – 79

Dana, Iowa
Dana, Iowa – 71

I would give Scranton the award for the best town sign in Greene County. Ralston would probably be last.

Here are the town signs from Story County.


Ames, Iowa
Ames, Iowa – 58,965

Nevada, Iowa
Nevada, Iowa – 6,798

Story City, Iowa
Story City, Iowa – 3,431

Huxley, Iowa
Huxley, Iowa – 3,317

Slater, Iowa
Slater, Iowa – 1,489

Roland, Iowa
Roland, Iowa – 1,284

Gilbert, Iowa
Gilbert, Iowa – 1,082

Maxwell, Iowa
Maxwell, Iowa – 920

Colo, Iowa
Colo, Iowa – 876

Cambridge, Iowa
Cambridge, Iowa – 827

Zearing, Iowa
Zearing, Iowa – 554

Collins, Iowa
Collins, Iowa – 495

McCallsburg, Iowa
McCallsburg, Iowa – 333

Sheldahl, Iowa
Sheldahl, Iowa – 319

Kelly, Iowa
Kelley, Iowa – 309

I would say that Collins has the best town sign in Story County. Sheldahl is is also solid. The worst is either Ames or Zearing.

Pastor Sarah once asked me what my favorite sign is so far. Of the three counties we’ve been over, these would be my Top 5:


Scranton, Iowa
#5. Scranton, Iowa

Collins, Iowa
#4. Collins, Iowa

Boone, Iowa
#3. Boone, Iowa

Pilot Mound, Iowa
#2. Pilot Mound, Iowa

Moingona, Iowa
#1. Moingona, Iowa

Now, that is how I feel today. I’m sure if asked tomorrow, I would rank a different Top5. But I think the Top 3 is pretty solid.

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This is your reminder that this week’s THE WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE theme is RUINS:


WEEK 272 - RUINS
RUINS

A RUINS picture is any picture of something that has seen better days.

Happy photo harvesting!