Pocahontas County Auxiliary Images Vol. 2

This the second and final collection of auxiliary images I took while harvesting the town signs of Pocahontas County. Although almost half of these images were taken in Buena Vista County.


Buena Vista County - Marathon
Marathon

Buena Vista County - Marathon

Buena Vista County - Marathon

Buena Vista County - Albert City
Albert City

Buena Vista County - Albert City

Buena Vista County - Albert City

Buena Vista County - Albert City

Buena Vista County - Albert City

Buena Vista County - Albert City

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas
Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas
I wonder if this is the same Bob from Bob’s Bench?

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Pocahontas County - Pocahontas

Don’t get me wrong. I hope the Pocahontas statue stands for a thousand years. I hope that when the apes inevitably taken over the planet from our failed species, that it is the head of this statue that Charlton Heston finds washed up on a beach before he damns humanity to hell. But man is it one ugly statue.

3 thoughts on “Pocahontas County Auxiliary Images Vol. 2”

  1. The statue does follow a philosophy of mine. If you are going to miss, miss BIG!

    It is a cool theater. I wish I knew what it looked like inside. Here is a little history on it:

    “The Rialto Theatre opened on September 3, 1939, designed in Streamline Moderne style, with seating for 200. It is located on Main Street. The theater remained in operation for half a century, closing in 1989. It was reopened in 1995 as a movie house and venue for live performances.”

    And here is another interesting bit:

    “Hallman got in contact with Dick Cook, President of Worldwide Marketing and Distribution for Walt Disney Studios, after several phone calls and memos to him and his secretary. Once Cook gave the greenlight for the idea of premiering the movie there for Iowa, a group of volunteers began working with the publicist company for the movie.

    Pocahontas released for theaters on June 23, 1995. The original premiere of the movie occured in Central Park in New York on June 10. The Iowa premiere occurred on Thursday, June 22. The celebration for the premiere started in the early afternoon and featured a lawn party, ice cream social, family picnic, and ribbon cutting. The current Iowa governor, Governor Brandstad, and Russell Means, a voice actor in the movie and Native American activist, both were in attendance. Several news stations were in attendance to cover the event.

    A statement made by Russell Means that sticks with Carol to this day is that the movie was the “best depiction of Native American life” in any movie up to that time that he had seen, and he was very proud to be associated with the film. Another Disney employee in attendance, Chris Buck, who served as a supervising animator on the movie, signed his name with an illustration of the dog he had animated for the movie in the Rialto green room. He’s since gone on to co-direct some notable Disney projects, including Tarzan (1999), Frozen, and Frozen II. “

  2. I would totally have pegged it as later, near mid-century. That’s fascinating.

    I also had no idea that they really had a tie-in with Disney for the premiere, and that it was seen so positively! I have seen so many negative comments since about how it glossed over the relationship between Pocahontas and the “explorers.” I suppose, at the time, any movement forward was well-received by the indigenous people.

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